Polarizer Glass Filter

Polarizer Glass Filter
circular polarizer, or circularly polarized filter for dSLR?

So I have a question about polarizing filters for Digital Slr cameras … There two types. 1: Circular Polarizer: the polarization is straight. Filter comes in a ring and can rotate the filter to change the angle of polarization in images. 2: circularly polarized. Circular polarization is actually on the glass. No rotation. So the question is, which is better. I've never bought a filter circular polarization, have always used the cheapest circular polarizers, but I've been wondering if it is more expensive route would be better. In any case, why what I choose one over the other, and is one better than the other? Plus: It seems that the correct name is linear polarizer, although they are all labeled Polarizer Circular. Or maybe the person who originally told me was completely wrong, but I have this whole idea of circular polarization vs Circular Polarizer stuck in my head and need someone to knock it loose and correct my thinking.

I think probably was explained incorrectly. Let me take a stab at it: Light is often described as being waves of energy. While this is not entirely true, is good enough for what we are doing that we assume to be the case. Anyway, light waves assume a sinusoidal shape as they travel through the air. Some, however, moves up and down (above ground), some are moving side side, and some are somewhere in between. The idea behind a polarizer is to get everything moving in the same direction-say, for our purposes who want everything to move up and down. The way it does this is by having a lot of slots (in our case, vertical) which relate to the width of a light wave. Thus, the waves traveling up and down will happen, but the light traveling team to another is completely blocked. For more in between, only up and down the component will get though. Thus, the waves emerging from the back of a polarizer just walk up and down. Because of how the filter is at a level microscopic, sometimes call this a linear polarizer. Some cameras use special types of mirrors, often called half-silvered mirrors or beam splitters in the way Optical. A beam splitter allows some light to pass well, but reflects some. Because of the way to work, a beam splitter also acts as a polarizer. Virtually all autofocus cameras beams depends plitters for the autofocus system to work. Some Canon cameras in the 70s and 80s, like my beloved F1, using a beam splitter, as part of the measurement system, and some canons in recent years have even used a beam splitter instead of a conventional mirror reflection (Pellix, EOS-1nRS). Anyway, one of the fundamental properties of the polarizers is to be black when arranged so that their slots are perpendicular to each other. By So if you use a conventional polarizer, it is possible that, if successfully changed, the polarizer will make the beam splitters out completely black. To counter that problem, sometimes a second filter is positioned behind the main polarizer. The purpose of this second filter is to stir the waves back to a random orientation, essentially turning the backlight to unpolarized light. This agreement, for some strange reason, is called a circular polarizer. Most polarizers for the cameras, either linear or circular, are mounted in a round starting rotation.

circularly polarizing filter test (REAL D glass) msmpeg4v2 400k